Teen Urban Tree Corps

Growing trees and teen leaders for Boston's future

Group of teens. Photo: SFTTB

Growing Trees and Teen Leaders for Boston’s Future

Our Teen Urban Tree Corps program is a 6-week paid summer program for Boston teens, age 15-18. Teens spend 25 hours per week learning about the importance of trees and how to care for trees, getting to know their neighborhood forests, and advocating for their community’s health and well-being.

Hiring of teens for the 2021 program has now closed. If you’re interested in learning more about future opportunities, please sign up for our newsletter.

Past Teen Urban Tree Corps Programs

This past summer we were proud to welcome, in person, 15 Boston teenagers to our reinvigorated summer program. Teens gained hands on experience in the field of forestry through field trips, talks from professional in the field of foresters, and the creation of micro forest plans for their neighborhoods.

In 2020, TUTC went remote. We hired 15 Boston teens. they explored the history, the present, and the future of five community forests in Boston: North Dorchester, South Dorchester, Hyde Park, West Roxbury, and Roslindale. Each group produced a an artifact or video about their community forest.

In 2019, with support from Boston’s Department of Youth Employment and Engagement and from Private Industry Council, SFTT launched its inaugural Teen Urban Tree Corps program. Nine Boston youth collected data on nearly 5,000 trees and empty planting sites in Roxbury and Dorchester.

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  • Ryan Woods with Teens Commissioner Woods discusses the importance of Boston's Urban trees

    “I met with the Teen Urban Tree Corps in the field ... [and] was impressed by their dedication and recognition of the importance of Boston's trees. The program stands as a model for engaging youth while the information they gathered will help us in planning Boston's green future.”

    Ryan Woods, Boston Parks Commissioner

  • Kids with free tree

    Tree Equity Matters

    Urban trees are a critical asset to cities: they sequester carbon, reduce energy usage, remove air pollutants, filter stormwater, and cool hot city streets by providing shade and releasing water vapor.

    Learn More about Tree Equity in Boston
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